The Anderson Center: Eliza Bozenski (Aired on April 4 and 5, 2020)

The Anderson Center for Autism returns as a topic for RadioRotary, this time with Chief Development Officer to describe the history and scope of the Center’s activities. autism
spectrum. The Anderson Center started as a school Autism is a complex syndrome that required a medical diagnosis to identify. The spectrum ranges from persons with slight problems functioning in society through to those who cannot speak or have other serious mental impairment. The Anderson Center has educational facilities from young persons from age 5 to 21, both residential and day programs. Also it supports group homes throughout Dutchess County. Among the topics covered in the RadioRotary interviews are ways to make stores and other public places friendlier to those with autism. In part because the Center serves individuals who have little money, there are fundraisers, including a golf tournament, and volunteers are always needed to help with these events. There is a lot more in the program, so listen and learn about this important topic and about our local Center that is known for its innovative programs.

Learn more:
Anderson Center for Autism: https://www.andersoncenterforautism.org/
Anderson Center on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AndersonCenterforAutism/
Podcasts of Eliza’s Radio Program, “1 in 54”:https://www.andersoncenterforautism.org/media/podcasts
Autism Spectrum Disorder: https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/autism-spectrum-disorders-asd/index.shtml
Parents Guide to Autism: https://www.helpguide.org/articles/autism-learning-disabilities/autism-spectrum-disorders.htm

Did you like this? Share it:
April 13, 2020 · Posted in Developmentally Disabled, Education, Health, Youth  

Saving Dogs with a Purpose (Aired March 28 & 29, 2020)

Erich Steffensen, Special Programs Manager at the Animal Farm Foundation in Amenia, NY, is the guest for this RadioRotary Program. The Animal Farm Foundation, although it does run an actual farm with rescue farm animals, is primary concerned with dogs—especially dogs that have been called “pit bulls” because of square-shaped heads and bulky bodies, although these are generally of no recognized breed (originally their ancestors were a cross between bulldogs and terriers, but other breeds have joined the mix over the years). One of the goals of the Foundation is to help erase the bad reputation of pit bulls for aggressive behavior. The other goal is to train shelter dogs—primarily pit bulls—for three different types of service: true service dogs, narcotic-recognizing dogs, and family pets. An early part of this training is conducted by prisoners at Riker’s Island, the “Paws of Purpose” program where the dogs go from shelters to 8 weeks at the prison. Formal training for narcotics-sniffers is conducted at a site in Texas; then the trained dogs are donated to police around the nation. Service dogs, including those who aid the hearing and mobility impaired (but not seeing-eye dogs), are trained at the farm in Amenia. All the programs are free to those who adopt the dogs, whether police who take K-9 dogs, mobility or hearing impaired persons needing help, or families that just want a friendly animal. Listen to the program and learn fascinating details about how trained dogs can solve problems and even save lives.

Learn more
Animal Farm Foundation: https://animalfarmfoundation.org/
Service Dogs: https://www.akc.org/expert-advice/training/service-dog-training-101/
Myths and Facts about Pit Bulls: https://www.petfinder.com/pet-adoption/dog-adoption/myths-and-facts-about-pit-bulls/

Did you like this? Share it:
April 13, 2020 · Posted in Animals, Service Organizations  

Insights from The Torah (Aired March 21 & 22, 2020)

RadioRotary Co-Host Jonah Triebwasser interviews Rabbi Jonathan Kligler of the Woodstock Jewish Congregation in this unusual and extremely interesting program based largely on Rabbi Kligler’s book Turn It and Turn It for Everything is In It. The book’s title comes from an ancient Rabbi’s saying about the Torah scroll that is a part of every Jewish temple and used in various services. The Torah’s text consists of the first five books of the Old Testament, common to Jewish and Christian faiths, but the scroll is a special handwritten version on parchment that is a physical representation of those texts. In a temple, the scroll is on rollers so that turning the rollers reveals a different part of the text. In the interview, Rabbi Kligler’s book consists of 54 chapters, one for each week in a lunar year, each relating to a specific passage of the Torah. There are deeper meanings that are found in the creation story and in the stories of Abraham, Jacob (Israel), Joseph, and Moses. Rabbi Kligler also tells a bit about his early career teaching dancing to children and about his other role today as a musician who has worked with many of the great folk musicians of the twentieth century.

Learn more
Woodstock Jewish Congregation: https://www.wjcshul.org/
Rabbi Jonathan Kligler: https://rabbijonathankligler.com/
Turn It and Turn It for Everything is In It: https://smile.amazon.com/Turn-Everything-Essays-Weekly-Portion/dp/1725251078/ref=sr_1_fkmr0_1dchild=1&keywords=turn+it+and+turn+it+Rabbi+Jonathan+Kligler&qid=1585405803&s=books&sr=1-1-fkmr0
The Torah and Torah Scroll: https://www.bbc.co.uk/religion/religions/judaism/texts/torah.shtml

Did you like this? Share it:
April 3, 2020 · Posted in Religion  

Working for Peace with the UN (Aired March 14 & 15, 2020)

Millbrook Rotarian Jim Lubin and his wife Diane visit RadioRotary to tell how they came to be Peacekeepers for the United Nations and involved in two of the more significant conflicts at the end of the 20th Century. Jim Lubin grew up in England during World War II and as a boy observed the American Air Force heading for the D-Day invasion of Europe. As a young man be made a career of proofreading, which eventually led to his being an editor at the United Nations, where he met and married Diane. Jim thought he could do more for world peace by volunteering to lead missions that the UN conducts to help maintain peace during conflicts. When he went to oversee elections in the new nation of Namibia in southwest Africa, Diane joined him on the mission—the first husband and wife team of UN Peacekeepers. With a successful mission to Namibia behind them, the pair volunteered to help resolve the conflicts between the new nations that used to be part of Yugoslavia, but this active war was between ethnic groups who were out to kill each other and who were not going to stop just because the UN was there. Having survived the war in Croatia, Jim and Diane retired to the United States. Diane was from Oneonta, NY, and had frequently driven the Taconic to New York City, so when the Lubins looked for a retirement home, exiting the Taconic at Millbrook became the key.

Learn more
Peacekeeping by the United Nations: https://peacekeeping.un.org/en
War and Election in Namibia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_African_Border_War
War in Former Yugoslavia: https://www.britannica.com/event/Bosnian-War
Millbrook Rotary Club: https://www.MillbrookRotary.org

Did you like this? Share it:
April 3, 2020 · Posted in Humanitarian Service, Peace, United Nations