Eliza Bozenski from The Anderson Foundation (Aired on June 10th 2017 and June 11th 2017)

Foundation Helps Those on Autism Spectrum (Aired on June 10 and 11,
2017)

Eliza Bozenski, Director of the Anderson Foundation for Autism, comes to the RadioRotary microphone to discuss the autism spectrum and how the Anderson Foundation’s several ways of outreach are making a difference for families that must cope with autism. Autism spectrum disorder is a developmental disability that ranges from what is commonly called Asperger Syndrome, which may be accompanied by high intelligence, to instances of autism that feature very low intelligence and serious disability. Early intervention makes a considerable difference in development; parents recognizing that a child may have a problem should not hesitate about taking the child to a physician for diagnosis. The Anderson Foundation provides a range of autism services, including residential treatment and consultation with families. One program helps businesses develop an autism supportive environment that can modify practices so that persons on the autism spectrum can feel more comfortable and handle business interactions more easily. There is a lot more to learn from this insightful interview.
Learn more:
Anderson Center for Autism
Autism Spectrum Disorder
Parents Guide to Autism
CATEGORIES
Developmentally Disabled
Health
Service Organizations

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Help for Adult Developmentally Disabled (Aired on November 4 and 5, 2016)

Help for Adult Developmentally Disabled (Aired on November 4 and 5, 2016)

RadioRotary interviews Holly Gaiman, Development Coordinator at InFlight, Inc., which supplies residential facilities, including group homes and apartments, for people with developmental disabilities.  Its mission is to ensure the people it supports reach their highest level of independence and inclusion into the community while living in a home setting.  InFlight operates throughout much of the mid-Hudson region, providing not only a home but also vocational services, art and music programs, activities of many kinds, and even the Can Do Café in Catskill, where residents meet to prepare the food. The residents served must be 22 years old or older and may be on the autism spectrum, have been born intellectually disabled, or suffer from brain damage. InFlight is supported by New York State’s Office for People with Developmental Disabilities (OPWDD).

Learn more:

InFlight

NYS Office for People with Developmental Disabilities

Developmental Disabilities

 

 

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The Anderson Center for Autism (Aired on January 9 & 10, 2016)

(l-r) Jonah Triebwasser, Eliza Bozenski, Sarah O’Connell

(l-r) Jonah Triebwasser, Eliza Bozenski, Sarah O’Connell

Eliza Bozenski is the development director for the Anderson Center for Autism, a nonprofit educational and therapeutic organization that includes day and residential programs for children and adults as well as diagnostics, training, and consultation for families or schools. Its hundred-acre walkable campus on the Hudson, where autistic students learn in classes with 6 or fewer other students, is just the most obvious part of the organization. It also encompasses 21 group homes,  three life-learning centers, a clinic, and consulting arrangements with local schools. This compelling RadioRotary interview tells the listener much about autism and the important place of the Anderson Center in its management.

Learn more:
Anderson Center for Autism
Autism Spectrum Disorder

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January 9, 2016 · Posted in Developmentally Disabled, Education, Health, Support Groups  

Abilities First – Education, Housing, Training (Aired on April 11 & 12, 2015)

(l-r) Jonah Triebwasser, Melissa McCoy, Sarah O'Connell

(l-r) Jonah Triebwasser, Melissa McCoy, Sarah O’Connell

Melissa McCoy, Chief Advancement Officer for Abilities First describes this seven-county program that serves developmentally disabled children and adults in the Hudson Valley. Staring with pre-school, Abilities First supplies educational programs that replace the regular special-education classes in twenty different facilities (one facility, in Red Hook, is in the same building as the regular school). When children reach age 21, they are transferred from the educational system to the New York State Office for People with Developmental Disabilities. From that point, Abilities First provides a sheltered workshop, job shadowing programs, and supportive or supervised housing. The focus is on helping individuals do as much for themselves as possible.

Learn More:
Abilities First
New York State Office of Mental Health
New York State Office for People with Developmental Disabilities
New York ARC

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