First Woman to Preside over RI (Aired on November 22, 2020)

RadioRotary is especially delighted to be able to interview Jennifer Jones, who for the Rotary Year 2022-23 will be president of Rotary International (RI), the first woman in the 115-year history of Rotary to achieve that high office. Until a little more than 30 years ago, there were no women officially in Rotary—a club in California that accepted women in 1977 was dropped from RI for this violation of rules. But ten years later the US Supreme Court ruled that Rotary could not reject members on the basis of gender, and US clubs began to admit women. The Canadian courts also recognized that Rotary clubs should be gender neutral and, in 1989, RI agreed, allowing clubs around the world to admit women members. President-nominee Jones, from the Windsor-Roseland Rotary Club (which spans Canada and the US), joined Rotary in 1997 and has been active at club and district levels ever since, becoming a director and a vice-president of RI. In her RadioRotary interview she tells her story and discusses how the Rotary Polio-Plus experience has provided thousands of workers who have been dealing with the Covid-19 pandemic. She reveals that RI has officially added protection of the environment to the six areas of focus and speaks of her interest in making the young-persons Rotary, Rotaract, a gateway to the full Rotary experience.

Learn more:
President-Nominee Jennifer E. Jones: https://www.rotary.org/en/jennifer-e-jones-makes-history-becomes-first-woman-named-rotary-president-nominee
Rotary International: https://www.rotary.org/en
History of Women in Rotary: https://www.rotary.org/en/history-women-rotary
Windsor-Roseland Rotary Club: https://www.roselandrotary.com/

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November 27, 2020 · Posted in Environment, Health, PolioPlus, Rotary International, Women  

Cornell Cooperative Extension, Putnam (Aired on June 22 and 23, 2019)

 

Since 1862, states were empowered to set aside land that would be used to fund
institutes of higher education that would feature agriculture and engineering
along with other studies. These “land-grant colleges” became the basis of a
1914 law that had the Department of Agriculture work in improving agriculture
and rural life. Today every state has cooperative extensions that carry out this
mandate, including extension offices in every country of New York State, which
work with Cornell University. For this program, Radio Rotary interviews Stefanie
Hubert, the Executive Director of the Putnam County Cornell Cooperative
Extension. There are many fascinating topics, ranging from the effort to
encourage farmers to grow hemp; the master-gardener program; advice for good
nutrition; and the 4-H program for youth—which on the last weekend in July in
Putnam County puts on the only free-standing 4-H Fair in the nation.

Learn more:
Cornell Cooperative Extension of Putnam County: http://putnam.cce.cornell.edu/
Cooperative Extension History: https://nifa.usda.gov/cooperative-extension-history
Master Gardeners: https://www.ahsgardening.org/gardening-resources/master-gardeners
Slow Food USA: https://www.slowfoodusa.org/

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July 14, 2019 · Posted in Education, Environment, Events, Health, Nutrition, Service Organizations  

Rich Schiafo on Food Recovery (Aired on January 27 and January 28, 2018)

Food Recovery in the Hudson Valley (Aired on January 27 & 28, 2018) Rich Schiafo of the Hudson Valley Regional Council returns to RadioRotary to tell the listeners about the national problem of food waste. Of the many astonishing statistics Mr. Schiafo discusses, perhaps the most alarming is that40% of all the food produced in the United States goes to waste, much of it landing in landfills where it contributes to the production of methane, a global-warming gas. Some of the food is left in the farmers’ fields, where it can be taken and used by gleaning—going through the field by hand and collecting the remaining food. Another waste is food that has been deemed imperfect or ugly in some way, but that is perfectly edible despite the flaws. Listeners will learn about the different interpretations of use-by or sell-by dates. There are many aspects to food recovery and prevention of food waste, with volunteers throughout the Hudson Valley making the effort to get otherwise disposable food into food pantries and shelters where it will be welcomed by the hungry.

Learn more:

Hudson Valley Regional Council
New York State Pollution Prevention Institute
Roundout Valley Growers
Imperfect Produce
The Ugly Fruit and Veg Campaign
Long Table Harvest

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February 17, 2018 · Posted in Environment, Hudson Valley, Nutrition, Volunteers  

Rotary International Convention From Atlanta Georgia Show Number 9 (Aired on January 13 and 14th, 2018)

Atlanta 2017 Rotary Convention, part 9 (Aired on January 13 & 14, 2018)

The ninth compilation of interviews with humanitarians conducted by
RadioRotary at the 2017 Rotary Convention in Atlanta focuses largely on
Rotarian Action Groups (RAGs) and their humanitarian aims, but it also includes
a special interview with golf-great Jack Nicklaus. Rotarian Action Groups
discussed include efforts to protect endangered species, prevention of all types of addiction from tobacco and gambling to heroin, encouragement for an increase in blood donations around the world, and training local communities in the method to correct clubfoot. Mr. Nicklaus tells why he is a Rotary Polio Ambassador, beginning with his own experience of polio at age 13.
Learn more:
RAGES Inc. (RAG for Endangered Species)
Rotarian Action Group Addiction Prevention
Global Network for Blood Donation
Rotarian Action Group for Clubfoot
Rotarian Action Groups
Rotary Partners and Ambassadors

 

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